Alberta Attorney General Projects

Family and Youth Court, Edmonton and Calgary, Alberta - 1983

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In the needs analysis stage of our work, we studied existing operations, assessed the impact of new legislation, and analyzed relevant statistics to establish a policy framework and statement of demand. During the development srategy phase, we produced area allocations, identified development possibilities, and generated initial cost estimates to determine both the facilities required and the most viable development options. In Edmonton, we estimated demand for 8 courtrooms, requiring 9000 square metres. In Calgary, court facilities would require 9500 square metres to accommodate 9 courtrooms. Subsequently, we evaluated three building options in Calgary: leased space in a lowrise office park building; leased space in a centrally located highrise office building; and expansion of existing accommodation in a downtown office building. We selected representative leased buildings; developed design concepts for each option; estimated costs; and conducted a benefit/cost evaluation. Completed in 1983.

Circuit Courthouses, Facilities Standards Study, Alberta - 1983

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The concept was to construct standardized single-courtroom facilities to accommodate Circuit Court in smaller centres throughout Alberta. We assisted in determining criteria for the selection of Circuit Court locations. The Facilities Program outlined the functions, area requirements and design guidelines. In addition, we worked with the architect to develop the prototype design. Later, we revised the program for use in a seminar at the University of Calgary. Completed in 1983.

Medicine Hat Courthouse, Alberta - 1982

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The courts in the City of Medicine Hat required expansion and the existing Courthouse, a designated historic resource, was to be reused for courts facilities. We assessed the demand for courts services; specified detailed spatial requirements; and determined the suitability of the adjacent site acquired for expansion. The Development Plan specified distinct functional and spatial separation of the Court of Queen’s Bench and the Provincial Courts; and that new construction be linked with the existing Courthouse. The Facilities Program included guidelines for the adaptive reuse of the approximately 1600 square metres in the existing Courthouse. Additional new construction of 6900 m2 would meet anticipated demand for the medium term. Completed in 1982.

Court of Appeal, Calgary, Alberta - 1981

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The Old Courthouse, an historic building set within a popular mini-park in Calgary’s downtown core, was selected to house a portion of the expansion to the Court of Queen’s Bench. We examined the implications of the historic designation; projected demand for services; identified criteria for the selection of an appropriate functional entity; and prepared urban design guidelines for redevelopment. Once the Court of Appeal was selected as the most suitable occupant, we specified its facilities program and illustrated how the requirements could be accommodated within the physical constraints of the Old Courthouse. The plan won the American Institute of Architects’ Architecture for Justice award. Completed in 1981.

Sheriff and Court Reporters Offices, Calgary, Alberta - 1981

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The Sheriff and Court Reporters Offices were selected for relocation from the Courthouse to a nearby building. This relocation was planned as an interim measure for up to five years. We studied the functional characteristics of the Sheriff and Court Reporters operations to confirm the feasibility of separating these services from other functions in the Courthouse. Personnel and space projections were generated, interrelationships were determined, and the fit within two floors of the nearby building was tested. The area required was approximately 2000 square metres. Completed in 1981.

Law Courts and Remand Facilities, Calgary, Alberta - 1981

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Courts and remand facilities were crowded and offered limited options for expansion. The purpose of our study was to examine the development options available. First, we drew upon previous work to project long-term demand for court and remand facilities. Second, we analyzed the development potential of several possible sites. Third, we matched the anticipated demand with the possible sites to generate a series of development options. Four of the most feasible options were selected and discussed in a verbal and graphic presentation. Finally, we prepared cost estimates and an implementation schedule for the preferred option. We also provided a presentation to senior management and prepared a summary for Government review. The initial estimate of total construction costs was $347 million. Completed in 1981.